New Zealand’s US$7.7 billion infrastructure package

By Andy Brown03 February 2020

Auckland

Auckland will receive a large proportion of the funding

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Arden has announced that the country’s government will be investing NZD$12 billion (US$7.75 billion) into infrastructure projects.

Of the investment over half, approximately NZD$6.8 billion (US$4.3 billion) will be spent on transport infrastructure, with roads getting the majority of this funding.

The country’s largest city, Auckland, will receive the most funding with a package including money for new road connections and rail upgrades.

“This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to invest in New Zealand – modernising our infrastructure, preparing for climate change and helping grow the economy. It makes sense to do this now because we’ve managed the books wisely and have historically low interest rates, which makes our programme affordable,” said Ardern.

The infrastructure package has also included NZD$400 million (US$258 million) in funding for school repairs and other building work.

MAGAZINE
NEWSLETTER
Delivered directly to your inbox, World Construction Week Newsletter features the pick of the breaking news stories, product launches, show reports and more from KHL's world-class editorial team.
Longer Reads
10 ways to join the hydrogen power revolution
Interest in the use of hydrogen has soared over the past few years as the construction industry races to reduce its carbon footprint. We roundup some recent initiatives
Telescopic boom lifts - the trends
Higher capacities and 100% electric models are the trend. And what lies ahead for 200ft models, or above?
How construction can become sustainable
The construction industry is undergoing a transformative shift to adapt more environmentally friendly practices
CONNECT WITH THE TEAM
Andy Brown Editor, International Construction Tel: +44 (0) 1892 786 224 E-mail: andy.brown@khl.com
Simon Kelly Sales Manager Tel: +44 (0) 1892 786 223 E-mail: simon.kelly@khl.com
CONNECT WITH SOCIAL MEDIA